Discussion:
Stations With No Exits
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h***@yahoo.co.uk
2021-02-22 11:24:13 UTC
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There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.

It literally has no exits.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Sam Wilson
2021-02-22 12:12:58 UTC
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Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Like Cornbrook used to be on the Manchester Metrolink, and even more
extreme than Dovey Junction and Corrour.

Sam
--
The entity formerly known as ***@ed.ac.uk
Spit the dummy to reply
Certes
2021-02-22 12:38:50 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Like Cornbrook used to be on the Manchester Metrolink, and even more
extreme than Dovey Junction and Corrour.
Smallbrook Junction (a diagonal move, but allowed whilst in Nidd)
Marland
2021-02-22 14:44:04 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Certes
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Like Cornbrook used to be on the Manchester Metrolink, and even more
extreme than Dovey Junction and Corrour.
Smallbrook Junction (a diagonal move, but allowed whilst in Nidd)
Well,,,its there to provide access to and from the heritage railway when
that is running and so you could argue that its point is purely to provide
pleasure by the ride on the heritage railway itself.

So under those rules other railways whose existence is just to provide a
ride for fun who terminate
at a platform somewhere with no access but people can get out and stretch
their legs or have a picnic between services could be counted as well.
Often such a stop was or is a precursor to future extensions but allows to
volunteers involved to fell they are getting somewhere and actually run
something .
That being said I have a mental block on an example at the moment,


GH
Recliner
2021-02-22 14:51:08 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Marland
Post by Certes
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Like Cornbrook used to be on the Manchester Metrolink, and even more
extreme than Dovey Junction and Corrour.
Smallbrook Junction (a diagonal move, but allowed whilst in Nidd)
Well,,,its there to provide access to and from the heritage railway when
that is running and so you could argue that its point is purely to provide
pleasure by the ride on the heritage railway itself.
So under those rules other railways whose existence is just to provide a
ride for fun who terminate
at a platform somewhere with no access but people can get out and stretch
their legs or have a picnic between services could be counted as well.
Often such a stop was or is a precursor to future extensions but allows to
volunteers involved to fell they are getting somewhere and actually run
something .
That being said I have a mental block on an example at the moment,
One example might be the E&OR, whose southern terminus is currently (and for the foreseeable future) Epping Forest.
GB
2021-02-22 15:52:28 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by Marland
Post by Certes
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Like Cornbrook used to be on the Manchester Metrolink, and even more
extreme than Dovey Junction and Corrour.
Smallbrook Junction (a diagonal move, but allowed whilst in Nidd)
Well,,,its there to provide access to and from the heritage railway when
that is running and so you could argue that its point is purely to provide
pleasure by the ride on the heritage railway itself.
So under those rules other railways whose existence is just to provide a
ride for fun who terminate
at a platform somewhere with no access but people can get out and stretch
their legs or have a picnic between services could be counted as well.
Often such a stop was or is a precursor to future extensions but allows to
volunteers involved to fell they are getting somewhere and actually run
something .
That being said I have a mental block on an example at the moment,
One example might be the E&OR, whose southern terminus is currently (and for the foreseeable future) Epping Forest.
North Norfolk Railway runs a service "to" Holt. Unfortunately, this
terminates two miles outside Holt, as a big chunk of the railway was
converted into a bypass.

Incidentally, the Kelling Heath Halt consists of a platform pretty far
from anywhere, although it does have footpath access. It's on a steep
incline, and only the downhill steam trains stop there. I think the
diesel railcars stop going uphill as well. You have to stick your hand
out - a bit like at a bus stop, although the stopping distance must be a
fair bit longer.
Peter Johnson
2021-02-22 16:51:00 UTC
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Post by GB
North Norfolk Railway runs a service "to" Holt. Unfortunately, this
terminates two miles outside Holt, as a big chunk of the railway was
converted into a bypass.
But you can leave the station, or access it to make a journey to
Weybourne and Sheringham
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-22 17:53:46 UTC
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Post by Recliner
Post by Marland
Post by Certes
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Like Cornbrook used to be on the Manchester Metrolink, and even more
extreme than Dovey Junction and Corrour.
Smallbrook Junction (a diagonal move, but allowed whilst in Nidd)
Well,,,its there to provide access to and from the heritage railway when
that is running and so you could argue that its point is purely to provide
pleasure by the ride on the heritage railway itself.
So under those rules other railways whose existence is just to provide a
ride for fun who terminate
at a platform somewhere with no access but people can get out and stretch
their legs or have a picnic between services could be counted as well.
Often such a stop was or is a precursor to future extensions but allows to
volunteers involved to fell they are getting somewhere and actually run
something .
That being said I have a mental block on an example at the moment,
One example might be the E&OR, whose southern terminus is currently (and
for the foreseeable future) Epping Forest.
I don't think a reversing point without a platform counts as a 'station';
surely you have to be able to leave the train for it to be a station?


Anna Noyd-Dryver
Graham Harrison
2021-02-23 04:09:05 UTC
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Permalink
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 22:40:09 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Recliner
Post by Marland
Post by Certes
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Like Cornbrook used to be on the Manchester Metrolink, and even more
extreme than Dovey Junction and Corrour.
Smallbrook Junction (a diagonal move, but allowed whilst in Nidd)
Well,,,its there to provide access to and from the heritage railway when
that is running and so you could argue that its point is purely to provide
pleasure by the ride on the heritage railway itself.
So under those rules other railways whose existence is just to provide a
ride for fun who terminate
at a platform somewhere with no access but people can get out and stretch
their legs or have a picnic between services could be counted as well.
Often such a stop was or is a precursor to future extensions but allows to
volunteers involved to fell they are getting somewhere and actually run
something .
That being said I have a mental block on an example at the moment,
One example might be the E&OR, whose southern terminus is currently (and
for the foreseeable future) Epping Forest.
I don't think a reversing point without a platform counts as a 'station';
surely you have to be able to leave the train for it to be a station?
It's shown on the route map and timetables.
Having finally read the Wikipedia article I discovered this is a
viewing platform. In which case it's similar to the stopping point on
the Jungfrau and the stop in the Royal Gorge near the hanging bridge.
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2021-02-25 18:46:37 UTC
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Post by Graham Harrison
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 22:40:09 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Recliner
Post by Marland
Post by Certes
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Like Cornbrook used to be on the Manchester Metrolink, and even more
extreme than Dovey Junction and Corrour.
Smallbrook Junction (a diagonal move, but allowed whilst in Nidd)
Well,,,its there to provide access to and from the heritage railway when
that is running and so you could argue that its point is purely to provide
pleasure by the ride on the heritage railway itself.
So under those rules other railways whose existence is just to provide a
ride for fun who terminate
at a platform somewhere with no access but people can get out and stretch
their legs or have a picnic between services could be counted as well.
Often such a stop was or is a precursor to future extensions but allows to
volunteers involved to fell they are getting somewhere and actually run
something .
That being said I have a mental block on an example at the moment,
One example might be the E&OR, whose southern terminus is currently (and
for the foreseeable future) Epping Forest.
I don't think a reversing point without a platform counts as a 'station';
surely you have to be able to leave the train for it to be a station?
It's shown on the route map and timetables.
Having finally read the Wikipedia article I discovered this is a
viewing platform. In which case it's similar to the stopping point on
the Jungfrau and the stop in the Royal Gorge near the hanging bridge.
There is a similar rail line in Greece, called the Diakopto–Kalavryta
Railway

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diakopto–Kalavryta_railway
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-25 19:32:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Graham Harrison
On Mon, 22 Feb 2021 22:40:09 -0000 (UTC), Recliner
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Recliner
Post by Marland
Post by Certes
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Like Cornbrook used to be on the Manchester Metrolink, and even more
extreme than Dovey Junction and Corrour.
Smallbrook Junction (a diagonal move, but allowed whilst in Nidd)
Well,,,its there to provide access to and from the heritage railway when
that is running and so you could argue that its point is purely to provide
pleasure by the ride on the heritage railway itself.
So under those rules other railways whose existence is just to provide a
ride for fun who terminate
at a platform somewhere with no access but people can get out and stretch
their legs or have a picnic between services could be counted as well.
Often such a stop was or is a precursor to future extensions but allows to
volunteers involved to fell they are getting somewhere and actually run
something .
That being said I have a mental block on an example at the moment,
One example might be the E&OR, whose southern terminus is currently (and
for the foreseeable future) Epping Forest.
I don't think a reversing point without a platform counts as a 'station';
surely you have to be able to leave the train for it to be a station?
It's shown on the route map and timetables.
Having finally read the Wikipedia article I discovered this is a
viewing platform. In which case it's similar to the stopping point on
the Jungfrau and the stop in the Royal Gorge near the hanging bridge.
There is a similar rail line in Greece, called the Diakopto–Kalavryta
Railway
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diakopto–Kalavryta_railway
I have a favourite fact about that line! "The line was to be electrified
and electric multiple units were ordered from Billard in France. Before the
cars arrived, the electrification plans were cancelled and the electric
multiple units were thus not usable when they arrived. As a makeshift
solution, a power car carrying a diesel generator was placed between the
two cars, a solution that has worked very well for decades.["

Even better, it seems they can (or could, at one time) replace one half of
the unit with a very ancient looking goods wagon!
<Loading Image...>

I don't see any mention there of stations to access viewing platforms only,
with no exit, though.


Anna Noyd-Dryver
Marland
2021-02-25 23:40:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is a similar rail line in Greece, called the Diakopto–Kalavryta
Railway
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diakopto–Kalavryta_railway
I have a favourite fact about that line! "The line was to be electrified
and electric multiple units were ordered from Billard in France. Before the
cars arrived, the electrification plans were cancelled and the electric
multiple units were thus not usable when they arrived. As a makeshift
solution, a power car carrying a diesel generator was placed between the
two cars, a solution that has worked very well for decades.["
Even better, it seems they can (or could, at one time) replace one half of
the unit with a very ancient looking goods wagon!
<https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Vouraikos-train_Peloponnese.jpg>
I don't see any mention there of stations to access viewing platforms only,
with no exit, though.
Anna Noyd-Dryver
Is that just a wagon or is it motored?

It reminds me somewhat of the Wheel Carriers(s?) that used to take
wheelsets from Acton works the short distance to and from Ealing Common
depot where they were removed or refitted to stock.
Originally the two 1905 built vehicles started life as Battery Locos for
the District Railwayor they could run from live track like their later tube
sized brethren.
During WW1 the batteries were removed as was the roof over them and they
became pure electric stores carriers, it is possible the District was leant
on as the batteries were the same type as used in
WW1 era Submarines for the Royal Navy.
Despite lasting till 1969 and scrapped the following year photos of the
pair are like hens teeth,
the nearest I can find is this one on a model site though it may rotate
through other things as well.

https://www.radleymodels.com/prods/346485/wheel-carrier-powered.html

which has a small photo of the real thing as a thumbnail


GH
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-23 04:50:33 UTC
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Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Recliner
Post by Marland
Post by Certes
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Like Cornbrook used to be on the Manchester Metrolink, and even more
extreme than Dovey Junction and Corrour.
Smallbrook Junction (a diagonal move, but allowed whilst in Nidd)
Well,,,its there to provide access to and from the heritage railway when
that is running and so you could argue that its point is purely to provide
pleasure by the ride on the heritage railway itself.
So under those rules other railways whose existence is just to provide a
ride for fun who terminate
at a platform somewhere with no access but people can get out and stretch
their legs or have a picnic between services could be counted as well.
Often such a stop was or is a precursor to future extensions but allows to
volunteers involved to fell they are getting somewhere and actually run
something .
That being said I have a mental block on an example at the moment,
One example might be the E&OR, whose southern terminus is currently (and
for the foreseeable future) Epping Forest.
I don't think a reversing point without a platform counts as a 'station';
surely you have to be able to leave the train for it to be a station?
It's shown on the route map and timetables.
As is Ipstones on the Churnet Valley Railway, but being a run-round loop in
the middle of nowhere still doesn’t make it a station.


Anna Noyd-Dryver
Guy Gorton
2021-02-23 10:18:25 UTC
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Permalink
On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 04:50:33 -0000 (UTC), Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Recliner
Post by Marland
Post by Certes
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Like Cornbrook used to be on the Manchester Metrolink, and even more
extreme than Dovey Junction and Corrour.
Smallbrook Junction (a diagonal move, but allowed whilst in Nidd)
Well,,,its there to provide access to and from the heritage railway when
that is running and so you could argue that its point is purely to provide
pleasure by the ride on the heritage railway itself.
So under those rules other railways whose existence is just to provide a
ride for fun who terminate
at a platform somewhere with no access but people can get out and stretch
their legs or have a picnic between services could be counted as well.
Often such a stop was or is a precursor to future extensions but allows to
volunteers involved to fell they are getting somewhere and actually run
something .
That being said I have a mental block on an example at the moment,
One example might be the E&OR, whose southern terminus is currently (and
for the foreseeable future) Epping Forest.
I don't think a reversing point without a platform counts as a 'station';
surely you have to be able to leave the train for it to be a station?
It's shown on the route map and timetables.
As is Ipstones on the Churnet Valley Railway, but being a run-round loop in
the middle of nowhere still doesn’t make it a station.
Anna Noyd-Dryver
My Bradshaw of March 1941 lists Ipstones but states that it is closed
to passengers. But the passenger trains to Waterhouses had stopped by
then so only frieight was being carried. That was a strange line with
a very odd history, but part of it remained in use for stone trains
for many years. Hence the passing loop.

Guy Gorton
Graeme Wall
2021-02-22 19:56:46 UTC
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Post by Certes
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Like Cornbrook used to be on the Manchester Metrolink, and even more
extreme than Dovey Junction and Corrour.
Smallbrook Junction (a diagonal move, but allowed whilst in Nidd)
Only if playing to Gumperson's rules.
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
m***@round-midnight.org.uk
2021-02-22 12:46:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Like Cornbrook used to be on the Manchester Metrolink, and even more
extreme than Dovey Junction and Corrour.
Corrour and Dovey Junction both have public access.

Smallbrook Junction has no public access.
Sam Wilson
2021-02-22 13:14:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@round-midnight.org.uk
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Like Cornbrook used to be on the Manchester Metrolink, and even more
extreme than Dovey Junction and Corrour.
Corrour and Dovey Junction both have public access.
Indeed, less extreme than the Japanese one.
Post by m***@round-midnight.org.uk
Smallbrook Junction has no public access.
As, apparently, does Manulla Junction in Co Mayo, according to the
Smallbrook Junction Wikipedia page.

Sam
--
The entity formerly known as ***@ed.ac.uk
Spit the dummy to reply
Mike Roberts
2021-02-22 14:28:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@round-midnight.org.uk
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Like Cornbrook used to be on the Manchester Metrolink, and even more
extreme than Dovey Junction and Corrour.
Corrour and Dovey Junction both have public access.
Smallbrook Junction has no public access.
We once missed the last train from Smallbrook Junction towards Haven
Street. We walked along the track until we came to a road bridge that
allowed us to escape. A shorter way back to where we were staying would
have been to continue all the way to Haven Street!
Marland
2021-02-24 11:08:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@round-midnight.org.uk
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Like Cornbrook used to be on the Manchester Metrolink, and even more
extreme than Dovey Junction and Corrour.
Corrour and Dovey Junction both have public access.
Smallbrook Junction has no public access.
One from the past I wanted to check had no public access up on was
Boscarne Exchange Platform a short lived stop installed by BR as late as
1964 to facilitate a shuttle service to from there to Bodmin North
connecting with the trains that were heading to and from Bodmin General.
One platform was normal height made from timber the other was at ground
level , the service was provided by one of the 4 wheel AC *rail buses that
were tried in that era and access was by the vehicles own steps.
It only lasted till early 1967 when the line closed.

https://flic.kr/p/EPuwG1



The present Bodmin and Wenford Railway now terminates there and has built a
new station somewhat more substantial than BR’s and that is easily accessed
by the public using the former trackbeds converted into trails, ironically
being one of the obstacles that has to be overcome
to extending the heritage railway down to Wadebridge.

GH
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-22 17:43:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
No exits or interchange either, just a viewing platform - similar principle
to the two intermediate tunnel stations on the Jungfraubahn (Eismeer and
Eigerwand, OTTOMH).

Smallbrook Jn has no exit but it does have interchange with the steam
railway; on Metrolink, Cornbrook similarly was interchange-only for the
first six years of its life.

I wonder how many similar examples there are around the world?

I don't know whether Pied du Barrage station on the VerticAlp Emosson
system has foot access but I think not
<https://goo.gl/maps/CFRi7HggbyBKCc8j6>.

*Googles* Manhattan Transfer is probably the most famous example!


Anna Noyd-Dryver
bob
2021-02-22 19:24:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
No exits or interchange either, just a viewing platform - similar principle
to the two intermediate tunnel stations on the Jungfraubahn (Eismeer and
Eigerwand, OTTOMH).
Though people have arrived at Eigerwand from outside and taken the
train away. It has been used on a few occasions as a rescue route for
climbers attempting to scale the North Face of the Eiger who got in
trouble.

Robin
tim...
2021-02-23 09:05:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
No exits or interchange either, just a viewing platform - similar principle
to the two intermediate tunnel stations on the Jungfraubahn (Eismeer and
Eigerwand, OTTOMH).
Smallbrook Jn has no exit but it does have interchange with the steam
railway;
Except in Disneyland world,

what would be the point of a station with no exits

AND

no connection possibilities?
Recliner
2021-02-23 09:32:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
No exits or interchange either, just a viewing platform - similar principle
to the two intermediate tunnel stations on the Jungfraubahn (Eismeer and
Eigerwand, OTTOMH).
Smallbrook Jn has no exit but it does have interchange with the steam
railway;
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
The ultimate examples used to be the now-closed, but still available in
emergencies, Tappi Kaitei and Yoshioka Kaitei stations on the Naka-Oguni to
Kikonai line. Trains stopped at them till 2014. I've photographed them from
a speeding passing train.
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-23 11:12:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
No exits or interchange either, just a viewing platform - similar principle
to the two intermediate tunnel stations on the Jungfraubahn (Eismeer and
Eigerwand, OTTOMH).
Smallbrook Jn has no exit but it does have interchange with the steam
railway;
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
The ultimate examples used to be the now-closed, but still available in
emergencies, Tappi Kaitei and Yoshioka Kaitei stations on the Naka-Oguni to
Kikonai line. Trains stopped at them till 2014. I've photographed them from
a speeding passing train.
Tappi-Kaitei was accessed by an underground funicular, which is still used
for tours of the station from the Seikan Tunnel Museum
<https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seikan_Tunnel_Tappi_Shakō_Line>

If we're counting tunnel evacuation stations, then there are (IIRC) two in
the Gotthard Base Tunnel and two in the Lötschberg Base Tunnel; and
arguably the entire length of the Channel Tunnel would qualify!


Anna Noyd-Dryver
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-23 11:55:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Recliner
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
No exits or interchange either, just a viewing platform - similar principle
to the two intermediate tunnel stations on the Jungfraubahn (Eismeer and
Eigerwand, OTTOMH).
Smallbrook Jn has no exit but it does have interchange with the steam
railway;
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
The ultimate examples used to be the now-closed, but still available in
emergencies, Tappi Kaitei and Yoshioka Kaitei stations on the Naka-Oguni to
Kikonai line. Trains stopped at them till 2014. I've photographed them from
a speeding passing train.
Tappi-Kaitei was accessed by an underground funicular, which is still used
for tours of the station from the Seikan Tunnel Museum
<https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seikan_Tunnel_Tappi_Shakō_Line>
Thanks, I didn't know about that.
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
If we're counting tunnel evacuation stations, then there are (IIRC) two in
the Gotthard Base Tunnel and two in the Lötschberg Base Tunnel; and
arguably the entire length of the Channel Tunnel would qualify!
JR trains used to stop at these stations until 2014, and passengers could
alight, so they were actual stations.
But at that point they were actual stations with exits; since then they've
effectively been closed stations which are available as emergency exits,
not active stations which trains stop at and passengers may leave the
train, with no exit.

Before the Gotthard Base Tunnel opened, SBB ran a number of
publicly-available special trains (2 per day for a month IIRC, bookable
through SBB website) which stopped at one of the underground stations for
passengers to leave the train for a tour of the facilities; so that station
would count if your Seikan Tunnel ones count, and indeed for the duration
of those trips, it counted for the original question too!


Anna Noyd-Dryver
Recliner
2021-02-23 12:15:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Recliner
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
No exits or interchange either, just a viewing platform - similar principle
to the two intermediate tunnel stations on the Jungfraubahn (Eismeer and
Eigerwand, OTTOMH).
Smallbrook Jn has no exit but it does have interchange with the steam
railway;
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
The ultimate examples used to be the now-closed, but still available in
emergencies, Tappi Kaitei and Yoshioka Kaitei stations on the Naka-Oguni to
Kikonai line. Trains stopped at them till 2014. I've photographed them from
a speeding passing train.
Tappi-Kaitei was accessed by an underground funicular, which is still used
for tours of the station from the Seikan Tunnel Museum
<https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seikan_Tunnel_Tappi_Shakō_Line>
Thanks, I didn't know about that.
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
If we're counting tunnel evacuation stations, then there are (IIRC) two in
the Gotthard Base Tunnel and two in the Lötschberg Base Tunnel; and
arguably the entire length of the Channel Tunnel would qualify!
JR trains used to stop at these stations until 2014, and passengers could
alight, so they were actual stations.
But at that point they were actual stations with exits; since then they've
effectively been closed stations which are available as emergency exits,
not active stations which trains stop at and passengers may leave the
train, with no exit.
No, I believe one of the stations had stopping trains, but no exits. There
was some sort of exhibition in the station.
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Before the Gotthard Base Tunnel opened, SBB ran a number of
publicly-available special trains (2 per day for a month IIRC, bookable
through SBB website) which stopped at one of the underground stations for
passengers to leave the train for a tour of the facilities; so that station
would count if your Seikan Tunnel ones count, and indeed for the duration
of those trips, it counted for the original question too!
Yes, indeed.
tim...
2021-02-23 13:01:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Recliner
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
No exits or interchange either, just a viewing platform - similar principle
to the two intermediate tunnel stations on the Jungfraubahn (Eismeer and
Eigerwand, OTTOMH).
Smallbrook Jn has no exit but it does have interchange with the steam
railway;
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
The ultimate examples used to be the now-closed, but still available in
emergencies, Tappi Kaitei and Yoshioka Kaitei stations on the Naka-Oguni to
Kikonai line. Trains stopped at them till 2014. I've photographed them from
a speeding passing train.
Tappi-Kaitei was accessed by an underground funicular, which is still used
for tours of the station from the Seikan Tunnel Museum
<https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seikan_Tunnel_Tappi_Shakō_Line>
If we're counting tunnel evacuation stations,
not really

I assume the the question is restricted to stations in service
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-23 10:04:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
No exits or interchange either, just a viewing platform - similar principle
to the two intermediate tunnel stations on the Jungfraubahn (Eismeer and
Eigerwand, OTTOMH).
Smallbrook Jn has no exit but it does have interchange with the steam
railway;
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
The Japanese example which started this thread, the two Jungfrau examples,
and the Royal Gorge quoted in another post, are all so you can get off the
train (while it waits) and admire the view, then get back on the same
train.


Anna Noyd-Dryvrr
Recliner
2021-02-23 10:11:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
No exits or interchange either, just a viewing platform - similar principle
to the two intermediate tunnel stations on the Jungfraubahn (Eismeer and
Eigerwand, OTTOMH).
Smallbrook Jn has no exit but it does have interchange with the steam
railway;
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
The Japanese example which started this thread, the two Jungfrau examples,
and the Royal Gorge quoted in another post, are all so you can get off the
train (while it waits) and admire the view, then get back on the same
train.
Not much of a view from Tappi Kaitei and Yoshioka Kaitei stations!
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-23 11:12:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
No exits or interchange either, just a viewing platform - similar principle
to the two intermediate tunnel stations on the Jungfraubahn (Eismeer and
Eigerwand, OTTOMH).
Smallbrook Jn has no exit but it does have interchange with the steam
railway;
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
The Japanese example which started this thread, the two Jungfrau examples,
and the Royal Gorge quoted in another post, are all so you can get off the
train (while it waits) and admire the view, then get back on the same
train.
Not much of a view from Tappi Kaitei and Yoshioka Kaitei stations!
You'd not mentioned them when I wrote (rather than posted) my reply; I'd
argue that they don't qualify any more than Norton Bridge or IBM do.


Anna Noyd-Dryver
tim...
2021-02-23 13:03:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
No exits or interchange either, just a viewing platform - similar principle
to the two intermediate tunnel stations on the Jungfraubahn (Eismeer and
Eigerwand, OTTOMH).
Smallbrook Jn has no exit but it does have interchange with the steam
railway;
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
The Japanese example which started this thread, the two Jungfrau examples,
and the Royal Gorge quoted in another post, are all so you can get off the
train (while it waits) and admire the view, then get back on the same
train.
as I said

a stop at a Disneyland attraction
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-23 19:31:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
No exits or interchange either, just a viewing platform - similar principle
to the two intermediate tunnel stations on the Jungfraubahn (Eismeer and
Eigerwand, OTTOMH).
Smallbrook Jn has no exit but it does have interchange with the steam
railway;
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
The Japanese example which started this thread, the two Jungfrau examples,
and the Royal Gorge quoted in another post, are all so you can get off the
train (while it waits) and admire the view, then get back on the same
train.
as I said
a stop at a Disneyland attraction
Sorry, I assumed you meant in actual Disneyland. Where all the *railway*
stations serve an actual transport service, IIRC.


Anna Noyd-Dryver
Sam Wilson
2021-02-23 22:48:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
No exits or interchange either, just a viewing platform - similar principle
to the two intermediate tunnel stations on the Jungfraubahn (Eismeer and
Eigerwand, OTTOMH).
Smallbrook Jn has no exit but it does have interchange with the steam
railway;
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
The Japanese example which started this thread, the two Jungfrau examples,
and the Royal Gorge quoted in another post, are all so you can get off the
train (while it waits) and admire the view, then get back on the same
train.
as I said
a stop at a Disneyland attraction
Sorry, I assumed you meant in actual Disneyland. Where all the *railway*
stations serve an actual transport service, IIRC.
Does the Paris one still have real steam trains?

Sam
--
The entity formerly known as ***@ed.ac.uk
Spit the dummy to reply
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-24 10:01:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
No exits or interchange either, just a viewing platform - similar principle
to the two intermediate tunnel stations on the Jungfraubahn (Eismeer and
Eigerwand, OTTOMH).
Smallbrook Jn has no exit but it does have interchange with the steam
railway;
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
The Japanese example which started this thread, the two Jungfrau examples,
and the Royal Gorge quoted in another post, are all so you can get off the
train (while it waits) and admire the view, then get back on the same
train.
as I said
a stop at a Disneyland attraction
Sorry, I assumed you meant in actual Disneyland. Where all the *railway*
stations serve an actual transport service, IIRC.
Does the Paris one still have real steam trains?
Yes <https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disneyland_Railroad_(Paris)>

AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.


Anna Noyd-Dryver
Sam Wilson
2021-02-24 10:12:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
No exits or interchange either, just a viewing platform - similar principle
to the two intermediate tunnel stations on the Jungfraubahn (Eismeer and
Eigerwand, OTTOMH).
Smallbrook Jn has no exit but it does have interchange with the steam
railway;
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
The Japanese example which started this thread, the two Jungfrau examples,
and the Royal Gorge quoted in another post, are all so you can get off the
train (while it waits) and admire the view, then get back on the same
train.
as I said
a stop at a Disneyland attraction
Sorry, I assumed you meant in actual Disneyland. Where all the *railway*
stations serve an actual transport service, IIRC.
Does the Paris one still have real steam trains?
Yes <https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disneyland_Railroad_(Paris)>
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
Cool! I remember one of the footplate crew, female, pointing out the
controls (in French - I didn’t get all of them) and opening the firebox
door for me.

Sam
--
The entity formerly known as ***@ed.ac.uk
Spit the dummy to reply
m***@potatofield.co.uk
2021-02-24 10:33:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:01:51 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Sam Wilson
Does the Paris one still have real steam trains?
Yes <https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disneyland_Railroad_(Paris)>
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
Far better than the pretend steam locos some of these railways have which
look great from a distance then as they get nearer you hear the ford transit
engine rattling away. I don't know why they bother , the point of steam is
the smell, sound and billowing steam. When we went on one near the seaside a
while back it didn't even fool my 4 year old (at the time) daughter who was
rather disappointed.
Marland
2021-02-24 11:22:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:01:51 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Sam Wilson
Does the Paris one still have real steam trains?
Yes <https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disneyland_Railroad_(Paris)>
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
Far better than the pretend steam locos some of these railways have which
look great from a distance then as they get nearer you hear the ford transit
engine rattling away. I don't know why they bother , the point of steam is
the smell, sound and billowing steam. When we went on one near the seaside a
while back it didn't even fool my 4 year old (at the time) daughter who was
rather disappointed.
Till it closed (under a cloud) the Poole park miniature railway had a
strange Loco,
diesel in the tender / bunker for drive ,small coal fire generating just
enough steam to blow the whistle ,send some steam up the chimney and
provide the coal smell.

https://twitter.com/Poole_Railway/status/962308538034016258/photo/1


GH
m***@round-midnight.org.uk
2021-02-24 11:38:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:01:51 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Sam Wilson
Does the Paris one still have real steam trains?
Yes <https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disneyland_Railroad_(Paris)>
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
Far better than the pretend steam locos some of these railways have which
look great from a distance then as they get nearer you hear the ford transit
engine rattling away. I don't know why they bother , the point of steam is
the smell, sound and billowing steam. When we went on one near the seaside a
while back it didn't even fool my 4 year old (at the time) daughter who was
rather disappointed.
That's excellent indoctrination. Well done!
m***@potatofield.co.uk
2021-02-24 11:56:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 11:38:42 +0000
Post by m***@round-midnight.org.uk
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:01:51 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Sam Wilson
Does the Paris one still have real steam trains?
Yes <https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disneyland_Railroad_(Paris)>
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
Far better than the pretend steam locos some of these railways have which
look great from a distance then as they get nearer you hear the ford transit
engine rattling away. I don't know why they bother , the point of steam is
the smell, sound and billowing steam. When we went on one near the seaside a
while back it didn't even fool my 4 year old (at the time) daughter who was
rather disappointed.
That's excellent indoctrination. Well done!
Entirely the responsibility of the Rev W Awdry, not me!
Graeme Wall
2021-02-24 17:43:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 11:38:42 +0000
Post by m***@round-midnight.org.uk
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:01:51 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Sam Wilson
Does the Paris one still have real steam trains?
Yes <https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disneyland_Railroad_(Paris)>
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
Far better than the pretend steam locos some of these railways have which
look great from a distance then as they get nearer you hear the ford transit
engine rattling away. I don't know why they bother , the point of steam is
the smell, sound and billowing steam. When we went on one near the seaside a
while back it didn't even fool my 4 year old (at the time) daughter who was
rather disappointed.
That's excellent indoctrination. Well done!
Entirely the responsibility of the Rev W Awdry, not me!
Three year old daughter of a colleague of mine on a trip to the
Watercress Line, Watching a loco arrive one of the people waiting,
trying to show off to his friends pointed out the 'Walschaerts' valve
gear. Little girl gives him a withering look and says "no it's not it's
Stephensons" - which it was. Not sure who was the more surprised, the
man or her dad.
--
Graeme Wall
This account not read.
Sam Wilson
2021-02-24 12:13:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:01:51 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Sam Wilson
Does the Paris one still have real steam trains?
Yes <https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disneyland_Railroad_(Paris)>
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
Far better than the pretend steam locos some of these railways have which
look great from a distance then as they get nearer you hear the ford transit
engine rattling away. I don't know why they bother , the point of steam is
the smell, sound and billowing steam. When we went on one near the seaside a
while back it didn't even fool my 4 year old (at the time) daughter who was
rather disappointed.
Isn’t the term “steam outline locomotive”?

Sam
--
The entity formerly known as ***@ed.ac.uk
Spit the dummy to reply
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-24 15:14:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:01:51 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Sam Wilson
Does the Paris one still have real steam trains?
Yes <https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disneyland_Railroad_(Paris)>
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
Far better than the pretend steam locos some of these railways have which
look great from a distance then as they get nearer you hear the ford transit
engine rattling away. I don't know why they bother , the point of steam is
the smell, sound and billowing steam. When we went on one near the seaside a
while back it didn't even fool my 4 year old (at the time) daughter who was
rather disappointed.
Some barely even try...
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/trainsandstuff/2933654833>


Anna Noyd-Dryver
m***@potatofield.co.uk
2021-02-25 10:03:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 15:14:51 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:01:51 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Sam Wilson
Does the Paris one still have real steam trains?
Yes <https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disneyland_Railroad_(Paris)>
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
Far better than the pretend steam locos some of these railways have which
look great from a distance then as they get nearer you hear the ford transit
engine rattling away. I don't know why they bother , the point of steam is
the smell, sound and billowing steam. When we went on one near the seaside a
while back it didn't even fool my 4 year old (at the time) daughter who was
rather disappointed.
Some barely even try...
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/trainsandstuff/2933654833>
That is pretty risible.
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-25 11:13:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 15:14:51 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 10:01:51 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Sam Wilson
Does the Paris one still have real steam trains?
Yes <https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disneyland_Railroad_(Paris)>
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
Far better than the pretend steam locos some of these railways have which
look great from a distance then as they get nearer you hear the ford transit
engine rattling away. I don't know why they bother , the point of steam is
the smell, sound and billowing steam. When we went on one near the seaside a
while back it didn't even fool my 4 year old (at the time) daughter who was
rather disappointed.
Some barely even try...
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/trainsandstuff/2933654833>
That is pretty risible.
Built in 1972 by the owner of the line to replace a steam engine! By the
time I remember it it was somewhat run down.


Anna Noyd-Dryver
Theo
2021-02-24 16:36:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
Far better than the pretend steam locos some of these railways have which
look great from a distance then as they get nearer you hear the ford transit
engine rattling away. I don't know why they bother , the point of steam is
the smell, sound and billowing steam. When we went on one near the seaside a
while back it didn't even fool my 4 year old (at the time) daughter who was
rather disappointed.
This reminds me of the 'vintage trolley' that you see in some American
cities. It's not a trolley, or a streetcar, it's a diesel on rubber tyres.
Just a normal bus in other words.

Theo
m***@potatofield.co.uk
2021-02-25 10:05:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 24 Feb 2021 16:36:07 +0000 (GMT)
Post by Theo
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
Far better than the pretend steam locos some of these railways have which
look great from a distance then as they get nearer you hear the ford transit
engine rattling away. I don't know why they bother , the point of steam is
the smell, sound and billowing steam. When we went on one near the seaside a
while back it didn't even fool my 4 year old (at the time) daughter who was
rather disappointed.
This reminds me of the 'vintage trolley' that you see in some American
cities. It's not a trolley, or a streetcar, it's a diesel on rubber tyres.
Just a normal bus in other words.
IIRC a few cities in the UK went through a daft phase of pretending bendy buses
were some kind of tram, putting silly covers over the wheels so you couldn't
see them. A triumph of braindead marketing over anyone with with an IQ larger
than their shoe size.
Marland
2021-02-25 10:43:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On 24 Feb 2021 16:36:07 +0000 (GMT)
Post by Theo
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
Far better than the pretend steam locos some of these railways have which
look great from a distance then as they get nearer you hear the ford transit
engine rattling away. I don't know why they bother , the point of steam is
the smell, sound and billowing steam. When we went on one near the seaside a
while back it didn't even fool my 4 year old (at the time) daughter who was
rather disappointed.
This reminds me of the 'vintage trolley' that you see in some American
cities. It's not a trolley, or a streetcar, it's a diesel on rubber tyres.
Just a normal bus in other words.
IIRC a few cities in the UK went through a daft phase of pretending bendy buses
were some kind of tram, putting silly covers over the wheels so you couldn't
see them. A triumph of braindead marketing over anyone with with an IQ larger
than their shoe size.
The idea of having a vehicle that resembled a tram on rubber wheels goes
back far longer and we in the UK cannot be too cocky.
The Shelvoke and Drury company more know for utility vehicles like
dustcarts and road sweepers and a few railcars once marketed a small
vehicle that they actually called a Tramocar , seaside towns were the main
users especially Worthing.
AFAIK no originals survive but Amberley museum have a replica body on an
chassis which was a freight vehicle from the same firm.

This shows it on a day out with the bad weather screens down.

http://www.sct61.org.uk/gallery/bpask/zzbp9822

Some of the services these would have been used on in the 1920’s -30’s
would now be being provided by Dotto trains.

GH
m***@potatofield.co.uk
2021-02-25 10:48:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 25 Feb 2021 10:43:17 GMT
Post by Marland
The idea of having a vehicle that resembled a tram on rubber wheels goes
back far longer and we in the UK cannot be too cocky.
France actually went one stage further and did have trams on rubber tyres.
Neither were very good. Translohr was one and there was another that they
had in Caen (binned a few years ago) who's name I can't be bothered to google.
I travelled on an example of the former in Clermont Ferrand. Dreadful.
Post by Marland
This shows it on a day out with the bad weather screens down.
http://www.sct61.org.uk/gallery/bpask/zzbp9822
Why? is the question that springs to mind.
Sam Wilson
2021-02-25 11:03:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On 25 Feb 2021 10:43:17 GMT
Post by Marland
The idea of having a vehicle that resembled a tram on rubber wheels goes
back far longer and we in the UK cannot be too cocky.
France actually went one stage further and did have trams on rubber tyres.
Neither were very good. Translohr was one and there was another that they
had in Caen (binned a few years ago) who's name I can't be bothered to google.
I travelled on an example of the former in Clermont Ferrand. Dreadful.
Venice has one, we discussed it quite recently, and of course Paris and
other places have metros with rubber tyres.

Sam
--
The entity formerly known as ***@ed.ac.uk
Spit the dummy to reply
m***@potatofield.co.uk
2021-02-25 11:23:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 25 Feb 2021 11:03:54 -0000 (UTC)
Post by Johannes Picht
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On 25 Feb 2021 10:43:17 GMT
Post by Marland
The idea of having a vehicle that resembled a tram on rubber wheels goes
back far longer and we in the UK cannot be too cocky.
France actually went one stage further and did have trams on rubber tyres.
Neither were very good. Translohr was one and there was another that they
had in Caen (binned a few years ago) who's name I can't be bothered to
google.
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
I travelled on an example of the former in Clermont Ferrand. Dreadful.
Venice has one, we discussed it quite recently, and of course Paris and
other places have metros with rubber tyres.
Rubber tyred metro trains are held pretty securely in place, not so rubber
tyred trams. Also they are far less efficient than steel wheel on rail, more
complicated infrastructure and the underground stations get rather hot!
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2021-02-25 19:11:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On 25 Feb 2021 10:43:17 GMT
Post by Marland
The idea of having a vehicle that resembled a tram on rubber wheels goes
back far longer and we in the UK cannot be too cocky.
France actually went one stage further and did have trams on rubber tyres.
Neither were very good. Translohr was one and there was another that they
had in Caen (binned a few years ago) who's name I can't be bothered to google.
I travelled on an example of the former in Clermont Ferrand. Dreadful.
Venice has one, we discussed it quite recently, and of course Paris and
other places have metros with rubber tyres.
Sam
The Venice-Mestre line is a TransLohr.
Sam Wilson
2021-02-25 19:24:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On 25 Feb 2021 10:43:17 GMT
Post by Marland
The idea of having a vehicle that resembled a tram on rubber wheels goes
back far longer and we in the UK cannot be too cocky.
France actually went one stage further and did have trams on rubber tyres.
Neither were very good. Translohr was one and there was another that they
had in Caen (binned a few years ago) who's name I can't be bothered to google.
I travelled on an example of the former in Clermont Ferrand. Dreadful.
Venice has one, we discussed it quite recently, and of course Paris and
other places have metros with rubber tyres.
Sam
The Venice-Mestre line is a TransLohr.
Yes, it’s a tram on rubber tyres.

Sam
--
The entity formerly known as ***@ed.ac.uk
Spit the dummy to reply
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2021-02-25 19:29:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On 25 Feb 2021 10:43:17 GMT
Post by Marland
The idea of having a vehicle that resembled a tram on rubber wheels goes
back far longer and we in the UK cannot be too cocky.
France actually went one stage further and did have trams on rubber tyres.
Neither were very good. Translohr was one and there was another that they
had in Caen (binned a few years ago) who's name I can't be bothered to google.
I travelled on an example of the former in Clermont Ferrand. Dreadful.
Venice has one, we discussed it quite recently, and of course Paris and
other places have metros with rubber tyres.
Sam
The Venice-Mestre line is a TransLohr.
Yes, it’s a tram on rubber tyres.
Sam
Exactly. That's what that is.
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-25 19:36:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On 25 Feb 2021 10:43:17 GMT
Post by Marland
The idea of having a vehicle that resembled a tram on rubber wheels goes
back far longer and we in the UK cannot be too cocky.
France actually went one stage further and did have trams on rubber tyres.
Neither were very good. Translohr was one and there was another that they
had in Caen (binned a few years ago) who's name I can't be bothered to google.
I travelled on an example of the former in Clermont Ferrand. Dreadful.
Venice has one, we discussed it quite recently, and of course Paris and
other places have metros with rubber tyres.
The Venice-Mestre line is a TransLohr.
Yes, it’s a tram on rubber tyres.
Exactly. That's what that is.
Whereas the Nancy system is the similar but less successful Bombardier GLT,
and is very much a guided trolleybus - the vehicles are unidirectional,
have twin trolleypoles, have steering wheels and leave the guideway towards
the outer ends of the route, and have a diesel engine to reach the
non-electrified depot.


Anna Noyd-Dryver
Basil Jet
2021-02-25 20:28:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On 25 Feb 2021 10:43:17 GMT
Post by Marland
The idea of having a vehicle that resembled a tram on rubber wheels goes
back far longer and we in the UK cannot be too cocky.
France actually went one stage further and did have trams on rubber tyres.
Neither were very good. Translohr was one and there was another that they
had in Caen (binned a few years ago) who's name I can't be bothered to google.
I travelled on an example of the former in Clermont Ferrand. Dreadful.
Venice has one, we discussed it quite recently, and of course Paris and
other places have metros with rubber tyres.
Sam
The Venice-Mestre line is a TransLohr.
Yes, it’s a tram on rubber tyres.
Wheels that float is a good idea in Venice.
--
Basil Jet recently enjoyed listening to
1999 - Field Recordings From The Cook County Water Table - Brokeback
Chris J Dixon
2021-02-26 08:18:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Basil Jet
Wheels that float is a good idea in Venice.
OTOH, those huge tyres on lifeboat launch tractors can be a
problem, and have to be partially water-filled to stop them from
floating.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1

Plant amazing Acers.
Marland
2021-02-25 15:30:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@potatofield.co.uk
On 25 Feb 2021 10:43:17 GMT
Post by Marland
The idea of having a vehicle that resembled a tram on rubber wheels goes
back far longer and we in the UK cannot be too cocky.
This shows it on a day out with the bad weather screens down.
http://www.sct61.org.uk/gallery/bpask/zzbp9822
Why? is the question that springs to mind.
The originals were conceived by the chap who developed them to be easier to
access than the motor buses of the period just after WW1, look how high the
platform was on the London B types and K types of the era, Worthing where
he lived had buses with similar high platforms and like now had a high
proportion of elderly amongst the population so he looked around for
something that was easier to get aboard.

The chassis had been developed by the Sheldrove and Drury company to be
low to suit various tasks like a small bin lorry ,carry milk churns etc and
was quite successful in achieving that and had
a turning circle on less than 22ft which made them very manoeuvrable.
The clutch mechanism was automatic which was important when most drivers
had little experience of working one many having previously handled horse
drawn vehicles.
With a short tiller for steering and another for operating the gear
selection with the driver being on a front platform they did resemble a
tram though the manufacturer did not design them that way intentionally ,

Loading Image...

the name Tramocar was a good bit of what we would now call marketing by the
Worthing resident for his low floor passenger version whose small size
allowed them to be used on the Sea Front which conventional buses did not
go along.
They were successful enough the main incumbent operator Southdown bought
him out but kept the name for the service.
Ok , it wasn’t a tram but it was a good marketing name in the same way as
that coach service between Oxford and London calls itself the Oxford tube
but doesn’t run on tracks Underground.
One or two other places tried them but never to the same extent as
Worthing,
tiller steering was banned by the mid thirties and the later
examples built by S D started to get bigger
loosing some of the advantage over normal buses.
This is one of the last ones .

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ron-hughes/6355084307


GH
Roland Perry
2021-02-24 11:30:13 UTC
Reply
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Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
What about monorails? (I don't think the one I saw in Florida was steam
powered).
--
Roland Perry
Mark Goodge
2021-02-24 12:33:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
What about monorails? (I don't think the one I saw in Florida was steam
powered).
This is one of the areas in which the terms "railway" and "railroad" are
not perfect synonyms. A rail "way" can include things like monorails and
funiculars. A rail "road", on the other hand, only ever means the sort
of thing on which normal trains run. That's a consequence of the
differing etymology of the two words, the latter being, literally, a
road made from rails.

And, of course, Disney being American, it has railroads, not railways.
So it is perfectly true to say that all Disney railroads are steam
powered. Disney monorails are a different thing.

Mark
Marland
2021-02-24 14:00:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mark Goodge
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
What about monorails? (I don't think the one I saw in Florida was steam
powered).
This is one of the areas in which the terms "railway" and "railroad" are
not perfect synonyms. A rail "way" can include things like monorails and
funiculars. A rail "road", on the other hand, only ever means the sort
of thing on which normal trains run. That's a consequence of the
differing etymology of the two words, the latter being, literally, a
road made from rails.
And, of course, Disney being American, it has railroads, not railways.
So it is perfectly true to say that all Disney railroads are steam
powered. Disney monorails are a different thing.
Mark
Though you have the anomaly that if the rails are set in the road then
they call it a street railway,
and the Disney version is horse drawn.

The term Railway wasn’t unknown in the USA even for Class one operations,
the Great Northern being one and the Southern another.
In recent years there have been many other Railways ,many just small
outfits . Often it followed a bankruptcy and the change from Up the Creek
and Broke Railroad to UP the Creek and We owe Money Railway was a
convenient way to operations going.

GH
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-24 15:14:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
What about monorails? (I don't think the one I saw in Florida was steam
powered).
Clearly the monorails aren't steam powered.

Perhaps I needed to specifically exclude rollercoasters from the definition
too? And the Main Street horse-drawn tramway?


Anna Noyd-Dryver
Arthur Figgis
2021-02-24 20:00:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
What about monorails? (I don't think the one I saw in Florida was steam
powered).
Clearly the monorails aren't steam powered.
https://www.museumsofindia.org/article/658/museum-on-rail
--
Arthur Figgis Surrey, UK
Sam Wilson
2021-02-24 20:32:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Arthur Figgis
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
What about monorails? (I don't think the one I saw in Florida was steam
powered).
Clearly the monorails aren't steam powered.
https://www.museumsofindia.org/article/658/museum-on-rail
And <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lartigue_Monorail>

Sam
--
The entity formerly known as ***@ed.ac.uk
Spit the dummy to reply
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-24 20:41:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by Arthur Figgis
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
What about monorails? (I don't think the one I saw in Florida was steam
powered).
Clearly the monorails aren't steam powered.
https://www.museumsofindia.org/article/658/museum-on-rail
And <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lartigue_Monorail>
In the lesser-known Disneyland Tralee? ;)


Anna Noyd-Dryver
Recliner
2021-02-24 21:40:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by Arthur Figgis
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
What about monorails? (I don't think the one I saw in Florida was steam
powered).
Clearly the monorails aren't steam powered.
https://www.museumsofindia.org/article/658/museum-on-rail
And <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lartigue_Monorail>
Wow, never heard of that!
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-24 20:40:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Arthur Figgis
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
What about monorails? (I don't think the one I saw in Florida was steam
powered).
Clearly the monorails aren't steam powered.
https://www.museumsofindia.org/article/658/museum-on-rail
Plus the one converted by Rich Morris. And the steam-outline diesel at
Listowel (of which I happened upon a rather excellent video by The Tim
Traveller recently


None of which run at Disney locations.


Anna Noyd-Dryver
Recliner
2021-02-24 21:40:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Arthur Figgis
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
What about monorails? (I don't think the one I saw in Florida was steam
powered).
Clearly the monorails aren't steam powered.
https://www.museumsofindia.org/article/658/museum-on-rail
Plus the one converted by Rich Morris. And the steam-outline diesel at
Listowel (of which I happened upon a rather excellent video by The Tim
Traveller recently http://youtu.be/UPWgJ6-iHM0
Yes, that one I've seen. Good video.
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
None of which run at Disney locations.
It's a pity Disney didn't combine ideas, and invent a Wild West steam
monorail!
h***@yahoo.co.uk
2021-02-25 19:27:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Arthur Figgis
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Roland Perry
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
What about monorails? (I don't think the one I saw in Florida was steam
powered).
Clearly the monorails aren't steam powered.
https://www.museumsofindia.org/article/658/museum-on-rail
The Moscow Metro actually had a museum on one of its revenue trains, I
believe on the Ring Line.

They literally converted one or two of the railcars into a picture
gallery.
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-24 15:14:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by Sam Wilson
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Sorry, I assumed you meant in actual Disneyland. Where all the *railway*
stations serve an actual transport service, IIRC.
Does the Paris one still have real steam trains?
Yes <https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disneyland_Railroad_(Paris)>
AFAIK it's a Disney 'thing' that if a park has a railway, it's always steam
powered.
Minor correction; the Hong Kong Disneyland Railroad has steam-outline
diesels.

Further reading reveals that Shanghai Disney Resort doesn't have a railway
at all; and the Western River Railroad at Tokyo Disneyland differs from the
other in not encircling the park, and having only one station (ie it's a
ride not a transport function). That's because of a Japanese law until 1987
which required any railway with more than one stop to issue timetables and
collect fares. The Tokyo line is also 2'6" gauge where all the others are
3'.

<https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rail_transport_in_Walt_Disney_Parks_and_Resorts>


Anna Noyd-Dryver


Anna Noyd-Dryver
tim...
2021-02-24 08:59:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by tim...
Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
No exits or interchange either, just a viewing platform - similar principle
to the two intermediate tunnel stations on the Jungfraubahn (Eismeer and
Eigerwand, OTTOMH).
Smallbrook Jn has no exit but it does have interchange with the steam
railway;
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
The Japanese example which started this thread, the two Jungfrau examples,
and the Royal Gorge quoted in another post, are all so you can get off the
train (while it waits) and admire the view, then get back on the same
train.
as I said
a stop at a Disneyland attraction
Sorry, I assumed you meant in actual Disneyland. Where all the *railway*
stations serve an actual transport service, IIRC.
Oh yes

I'd forgotten about those "trains"

Perhaps I should have said Disneyfyed world

sorry
Theo
2021-02-23 11:50:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tim...
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
Operational reasons. For example, this station covered a passing loop and
watering point, but was in the middle of nowhere so no need for access.
Even today it's about 4km from the nearest road.
https://www.railscot.co.uk/locations/L/Loch_Skerrow/

Theo
tim...
2021-02-23 13:10:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Theo
Post by tim...
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
Operational reasons. For example, this station covered a passing loop and
watering point, but was in the middle of nowhere so no need for access.
Even today it's about 4km from the nearest road.
https://www.railscot.co.uk/locations/L/Loch_Skerrow/
but why have a station

there are plenty of passing/turnback loops with no facilities for passages
to alight

of which the weirdest is Coomb Junction (not in the station). What's that
all about why not just stop in the station?
m***@round-midnight.org.uk
2021-02-23 14:00:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tim...
Post by tim...
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
Operational reasons.  For example, this station covered a passing loop
and
watering point, but was in the middle of nowhere so no need for access.
Even today it's about 4km from the nearest road.
https://www.railscot.co.uk/locations/L/Loch_Skerrow/
but why have a station
there are plenty of passing/turnback loops with no facilities for
passages to alight
of which the weirdest is Coomb Junction (not in the station).  What's
that all about why not just stop in the station?
Even if they proceed to the station they still need to stop at the
junction to manipulate the points.
Mark Goodge
2021-02-23 14:09:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tim...
Post by Theo
Post by tim...
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
Operational reasons. For example, this station covered a passing loop and
watering point, but was in the middle of nowhere so no need for access.
Even today it's about 4km from the nearest road.
https://www.railscot.co.uk/locations/L/Loch_Skerrow/
but why have a station
Because, although it didn't serve a built-up area, it was useful for the
farming community. There's no public highway access, but there is a
track which leads south from the station to some farms which are closer
to (the former) Loch Skerrow Halt than they are by road to any
settlement or to any other railway station.

Mark
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-23 19:31:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tim...
Post by Theo
Post by tim...
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
Operational reasons. For example, this station covered a passing loop and
watering point, but was in the middle of nowhere so no need for access.
Even today it's about 4km from the nearest road.
https://www.railscot.co.uk/locations/L/Loch_Skerrow/
but why have a station
there are plenty of passing/turnback loops with no facilities for passages
to alight
of which the weirdest is Coomb Junction (not in the station). What's that
all about why not just stop in the station?
I presume that's because the ground frame for the guard to operate the
points is at the junction, so a train which draws forward to the station to
reverse *also* has to stop at the junction to operate the points.


Anna Noyd-Dryver
Marland
2021-02-23 19:39:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tim...
but why have a station
there are plenty of passing/turnback loops with no facilities for passages
to alight
of which the weirdest is Coomb Junction (not in the station). What's that
all about why not just stop in the station?
Hardly any trains are booked to run to the station 2 a day or something
like that added to which
the train has to stop where the junction is as that is where the conductor
has to work the ground frame to get access to and from the Coombe-Looe
section . Once on that section the point has
to be reset pointing up the incline to Liskeard as that allows a freight
movement from Liskeard to Coombe junction and on to Moorswater or the
reverse of that while the passenger unit is between Combe and Looe.
Going past the junction to the Halt adds a few more minutes each way and
adds a third stop for hardly any revenue , the ones that do go as far as
the halt may well just be run to save the closure process.

Freight traffic on the route has just ceased again so unless another flow
occurs there will be even less reason to retain the track to the Halt.
GH
Sam Wilson
2021-02-23 16:04:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Theo
Post by tim...
Except in Disneyland world,
what would be the point of a station with no exits
AND
no connection possibilities?
Operational reasons. For example, this station covered a passing loop and
watering point, but was in the middle of nowhere so no need for access.
Even today it's about 4km from the nearest road.
https://www.railscot.co.uk/locations/L/Loch_Skerrow/
I’ve been there, twice, approximately 40 years apart. There are still
interesting bits of waterworks around the site.

Sam
--
The entity formerly known as ***@ed.ac.uk
Spit the dummy to reply
D A Stocks
2021-02-23 17:16:03 UTC
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Post by Anna Noyd-Dryver
*Googles* Manhattan Transfer is probably the most famous example!
But that bo longer exists. This is an active example:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newark_Liberty_International_Airport_Station

--
DAS
Guy
2021-02-23 13:00:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
The long closed Trent station came close. But it was accessible on foot.
Johannes Picht
2021-02-23 20:01:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Hello!
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Has Sagliains station been mentioned yet?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sagliains_railway_station

Cheers,

Johannes.
Recliner
2021-02-23 22:15:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Johannes Picht
Hello!
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Has Sagliains station been mentioned yet?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sagliains_railway_station
That sounds like it must have road access?
Johannes Picht
2021-02-24 20:07:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Recliner
Post by Johannes Picht
Hello!
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Has Sagliains station been mentioned yet?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sagliains_railway_station
That sounds like it must have road access?
Road access yes, but only for the car shuttle through the Vereina
tunnel. The platform is limited to interchange between trains.

{Sagliains station is halfway between the villages of Susch and Lavin
which have their own stations.
https://www.google.de/maps/@46.7625066,10.0961886,774m/data=!3m1!1e3!5m1!1e1
}

Cheers,

Johannes.
Mark Goodge
2021-02-24 21:34:17 UTC
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On Wed, 24 Feb 2021 21:07:45 +0100, Johannes Picht
Post by Johannes Picht
Post by Recliner
Post by Johannes Picht
Hello!
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Has Sagliains station been mentioned yet?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sagliains_railway_station
That sounds like it must have road access?
Road access yes, but only for the car shuttle through the Vereina
tunnel. The platform is limited to interchange between trains.
{Sagliains station is halfway between the villages of Susch and Lavin
which have their own stations.
}
It's also got Google Street View on the track!

https://goo.gl/maps/GoNZ225LqJwWx3n58

Mark
Anna Noyd-Dryver
2021-02-23 23:51:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Johannes Picht
Hello!
Post by h***@yahoo.co.uk
There is apparently one in Japan, which opened in March 2019.
It literally has no exits.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiryu_Miharashi_Station
Has Sagliains station been mentioned yet?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sagliains_railway_station
Fascinating, I didn't realise that, thanks!


Anna Noyd-Dryver
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