Discussion:
Building near Euston
(too old to reply)
Mike Buckley
2008-02-15 18:15:04 UTC
Permalink
Just curious - been travelling to Euston this week and noticed an old
unused large shed near Euston station. Anybody know what it was used
for? It's got OHE, but the entrance for the trains is fenced off - if
you look on google maps you can clearly see it between Mornington
Terrace and Park Village E.

Looks like an old maintenance depot?
--
Mike Buckley
Neil Williams
2008-02-15 18:22:05 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 18:15:04 +0000, Mike Buckley
Post by Mike Buckley
Just curious - been travelling to Euston this week and noticed an old
unused large shed near Euston station. Anybody know what it was used
for? It's got OHE, but the entrance for the trains is fenced off - if
you look on google maps you can clearly see it between Mornington
Terrace and Park Village E.
Looks like an old maintenance depot?
Postal traffic, I think.

Neil
--
Neil Williams
Put my first name before the at to reply.
BH Williams
2008-02-15 18:47:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil Williams
On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 18:15:04 +0000, Mike Buckley
Post by Mike Buckley
Just curious - been travelling to Euston this week and noticed an old
unused large shed near Euston station. Anybody know what it was used
for? It's got OHE, but the entrance for the trains is fenced off - if
you look on google maps you can clearly see it between Mornington
Terrace and Park Village E.
Looks like an old maintenance depot?
Postal traffic, I think.
Neil
--
Neil Williams
Put my first name before the at to reply.
Euston Down Side Carriage Maintenance Depot- redundant since loco-hauled
trains were replaced by Pendelinos and mail traffic went to the Princess
Royal Distribution Centre at Wembley.
Brian
Charles Ellson
2008-02-15 18:57:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil Williams
On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 18:15:04 +0000, Mike Buckley
Post by Mike Buckley
Just curious - been travelling to Euston this week and noticed an old
unused large shed near Euston station. Anybody know what it was used
for? It's got OHE, but the entrance for the trains is fenced off - if
you look on google maps you can clearly see it between Mornington
Terrace and Park Village E.
Looks like an old maintenance depot?
Postal traffic, I think.
That sounds like the Down Side Carriage Shed which I don't recall
noticing having any easy street access. Postal traffic used (as in ten
or more years ago) the station itself, either platforms 1 and 2 or the
"hidden" (i.e. not signed from the concourse) platforms on the west
side.
Neil Williams
2008-02-16 09:31:39 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 18:57:02 +0000, Charles Ellson
Post by Charles Ellson
That sounds like the Down Side Carriage Shed which I don't recall
noticing having any easy street access. Postal traffic used (as in ten
or more years ago) the station itself, either platforms 1 and 2 or the
"hidden" (i.e. not signed from the concourse) platforms on the west
side.
16, 17 and 18? Or are there more I haven't noticed?

Neil
--
Neil Williams
Put my first name before the at to reply.
Mizter T
2008-02-16 13:51:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil Williams
On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 18:57:02 +0000, Charles Ellson
Post by Charles Ellson
That sounds like the Down Side Carriage Shed which I don't recall
noticing having any easy street access. Postal traffic used (as in ten
or more years ago) the station itself, either platforms 1 and 2 or the
"hidden" (i.e. not signed from the concourse) platforms on the west
side.
16, 17 and 18? Or are there more I haven't noticed?
Neil
That's all there is. I presume Charles is implying that they didn't
used to be used for passenger trains but were for postal traffic,
which is I think something I've read elsewhere. I don't know when they
became public platforms.

Incidentally, for anyone who's feeling lost, here's a simple plan of
Euston station (PDF):
http://www.networkrail.co.uk/documents/For%20Passengers/Station%20Maps/4500_Euston%20Station%20Map.pdf
Stimpy
2008-02-16 15:04:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mizter T
Incidentally, for anyone who's feeling lost, here's a simple plan of
http://www.networkrail.co.uk/documents/For%20Passengers/Station%20Maps/4500_Eu
Post by Mizter T
ston%20Station%20Map.pdf
Out of interest, does anyone know why the buffer line doesn't align? Why do
some platforms extend beyond the ramp ends and others dont?
Charles Ellson
2008-02-16 19:00:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mizter T
Post by Mizter T
Incidentally, for anyone who's feeling lost, here's a simple plan of
http://www.networkrail.co.uk/documents/For%20Passengers/Station%20Maps/4500_Eu
Post by Mizter T
ston%20Station%20Map.pdf
Out of interest, does anyone know why the buffer line doesn't align? Why do
some platforms extend beyond the ramp ends and others dont?
Ex-motorail platforms requiring end-on vehicle access and room to
allow vehicles to drive past to the next platform ?
Andy
2008-02-16 19:19:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mizter T
Incidentally, for anyone who's feeling lost, here's a simple plan of
http://www.networkrail.co.uk/documents/For%20Passengers/Station%20Map...
Post by Mizter T
ston%20Station%20Map.pdf
Out of interest, does anyone know why the buffer line doesn't align?  Why do
some platforms extend beyond the ramp ends and others dont?
I think it is just a compromise between the access to the platforms
down the ramps and the length of the trains that can access the
platforms. The platforms at the end of the ramps are 2-3 coach lengths
shorter than those to the side of the ramps. So, for example,
platforms 8 and 11 take at least 12 coach trains, whilst 9 and 10
(buffers opposite the entrance) are a maximum of 10 coaches. Making
some of the platforms go beyond the access ramps allows longer trains
to use those platforms.
k***@holdthefrontpage.co.uk
2008-02-17 00:58:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy
I think it is just a compromise between the access to the platforms
down the ramps and the length of the trains that can access the
platforms. The platforms at the end of the ramps are 2-3 coach lengths
shorter than those to the side of the ramps. So, for example,
platforms 8 and 11 take at least 12 coach trains, whilst 9 and 10
(buffers opposite the entrance) are a maximum of 10 coaches. Making
some of the platforms go beyond the access ramps allows longer trains
to use those platforms.
I think the main reason was to provide the suburban platforms with
their own 'sub-concourse', and direct access to the underground.
Neil Williams
2008-02-16 18:15:46 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 05:51:10 -0800 (PST), Mizter T
Post by Mizter T
That's all there is. I presume Charles is implying that they didn't
used to be used for passenger trains but were for postal traffic,
which is I think something I've read elsewhere. I don't know when they
became public platforms.
This might be why they never had any kind of PIS display until the
last few weeks when they've gained the new LED ones, and might also be
why there's a double-sided platform there (17, I think).

Neil
--
Neil Williams
Put my first name before the at to reply.
Charles Ellson
2008-02-16 18:54:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil Williams
On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 18:57:02 +0000, Charles Ellson
Post by Charles Ellson
That sounds like the Down Side Carriage Shed which I don't recall
noticing having any easy street access. Postal traffic used (as in ten
or more years ago) the station itself, either platforms 1 and 2 or the
"hidden" (i.e. not signed from the concourse) platforms on the west
side.
16, 17 and 18? Or are there more I haven't noticed?
Going back a few years, IIRC there was one platform used occasionally
for passenger services which was reached by going out of an unmarked
(at that time) door near the police office/luggage lockers, one very
short platform near the PSB which used to have a bullion van parked in
it on certain days of the week and one or two others in between which
were used for newspaper and postal traffic.
k***@holdthefrontpage.co.uk
2008-02-17 01:00:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Charles Ellson
Going back a few years, IIRC there was one platform used occasionally
for passenger services which was reached by going out of an unmarked
(at that time) door near the police office/luggage lockers, one very
short platform near the PSB which used to have a bullion van parked in
it on certain days of the week and one or two others in between which
were used for newspaper and postal traffic.
The very short platform was 21 Road, often home to the station pilot
engine in the days when it was a Class 25.
k***@holdthefrontpage.co.uk
2008-02-17 01:07:00 UTC
Permalink
On 15 Feb, 18:57, Charles Ellson <***@ellson.demon.co.uk> wrote:
ly see it between Mornington
Post by Charles Ellson
That sounds like the Down Side Carriage Shed which I don't recall
noticing having any easy street access.
Usually referred to by staff as 'Port Arthur'. Pedestrian access was
available through the red brick building at the end of the shed, on
Granby Terrace, with an internal staircase to track level. The usual
walking route was via the Down side of the track, past the calcium
carbide bins under Hampstead Road bridge, with entrance through a door
near the south end of the shed.
Nigel Emery <>
2008-02-15 22:27:40 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 18:15:04 +0000, Mike Buckley
Post by Mike Buckley
Just curious - been travelling to Euston this week and noticed an old
unused large shed near Euston station. Anybody know what it was used
for? It's got OHE, but the entrance for the trains is fenced off - if
you look on google maps you can clearly see it between Mornington
Terrace and Park Village E.
Looks like an old maintenance depot?
Euston Downside, I not 100% sure of the buildings history but in the
more recent past it was used by Rail Express Systems and later EWS as
the London base for the maintenance of postal stock. Primarily this
was loco hauled stock although I have seen photos of 325 units in
there. I think I'm right in saying that it only closed after EWS
completely lost all mail traffic. I had an organised visit there in
1995. My only photo from that visit is now online at:
http://slindon.fotopic.net/p48437056.html

Nigel
k***@holdthefrontpage.co.uk
2008-02-17 01:14:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nigel Emery <>
Euston Downside, I not 100% sure of the buildings history but in the
more recent past it was used by Rail Express Systems and later EWS as
the London base for the maintenance of postal stock. Primarily this
was loco hauled stock although I have seen photos of 325 units in
there.
In the days of vacuum-braked stock there was a special dispensation in
the Sectional Appendix allowing trains waiting to back down into
Euston, having been drawn out of the Down Line Carriage Shed, to have
the Guard's brake valve wedged open. The shunters in charge of these
movements were provided with a special tool for this normally
forbidden practice.

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